Tufts University: 2018 Accepted Essays

Example Common App Essays and Supplements
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Introduction

Located in the suburban setting of Medford, Massachusetts, Tufts University is known for being a small-medium private college just outside of Boston. Tufts is best known for its strong academics, study abroad programs, and emphasis on public service.

Tufts is a very selective college. For the class of 2020, Tufts accepted about 2,900 applications of the over 20,000 that Tufts received, giving Tufts an overall acceptance rate of 14.3%. The School of Arts and Sciences had an acceptance rate of 14.9% while the School of Engineering had one of 11.7%.

Since Tufts is such a selective college, admission is quite difficult. To stand your best shot at getting accepted, your essays need to make you stand out. Below are some accepted essays written by real students accepted by Tufts.

Without further ado, let's jump right in!

Essays and Supplements

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Tufts Common App Personal Statement #1

Written by Anonymous Student

Verified Real Acceptance


Prompt

Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

I was 4.

Blue blanket in one hand, cookie monster in the other, I stumbled down the steps to fill my sippy cup with coffee. My diplomatic self gulped down his caffeine while admiring his Harry Potter wands. My father and I watched the sunrise through the trees and windows. I cherished this small moment before my father left, disappearing in and out of my life at the wave of a wand, harassing my seemingly broken, but nevertheless, stronger, family.

I was 10, and my relationship with coffee flourished as my father vanished. I admired the average, yet complex beverage and may have been the only ten-year-old to ask for a French-press for his birthday. Nonetheless, learning to craft intricate cups of coffee became my favorite pastime. I spent hours studying how to “bloom” the grounds in a Chemex or pour a swan. Each holiday, I would ask for an aeropress, an espresso machine. I became a coffee connoisseur, infinitely perfecting my own form of art.

As the years went by--I was 11, 12, 13--I began to explore the cafes in Pittsburgh with my grandmother, capturing them through our shared love for photography. Coffee (one of the few positive memories I have of my father) is also the bridge that allows my grandmother and I to converge our distinctly different backgrounds into one harmonious relationship. Inside quaint coffee shops, we would discuss pop culture, fashion, and the meaning of life. We made it our mission to visit every cafe and document them not only through the camera lens, but also through the conversations we shared.

I was 16 years old, and working at a family-owned coffee shop training other employees to pour latte art. Making coffee became an artistic outlet that I never had before. I always loved math, but once I explored the complexities of coffee, I began to delve into a more creative realm--photography and writing--and exposed myself to the arts--something foreign and intriguing.

When my father left and my world exploded, coffee remained a light amongst the darkness. As the steam permeates my nostrils and the bitterness tickles my tongue, I learn a little more about myself. The act of pouring water over grounds allows me to slow down time for a moment, and reflect upon my day, my life, my dreams, and my future. When I dive into a morning cup, I take a plunge into the sea of the self, and as I sip, am struck with the feeling that coffee is a universal link between cultures. I picture my great grandmother sitting on her front porch in Rome, slurping LaVazza and eating her coffee-soaked biscotti. Every cup takes me back to my heritage, forces me to reflect upon where I came from and where I must go, and who else, in another world, is sipping the same drink and reflecting upon the same principles. You see, coffee is like the ocean. It bridges two culture, two lands, two brains, all through conversation, exposure, exploration, but by one medium. I do not see it as simply a beverage, but rather, a vehicle for so much more.

At 18, coffee is a part of who I am--humble, yet important, simple, yet complex, and rudimentary, yet developed. As I explore new coffee shops, I explore a new part of myself, one once hidden beneath the surface of my persona. My grandmother and I--we are conquistadors of the cafe scene, conquering the world one coffee shop at a time and, in the process, growing endlessly closer to each other and ourselves. Coffee has allowed our relationship to flourish into a perpetual story of exploration and self-reflection.

Now, I often think about my father and how someone whom I resent so much could have introduced me to something I love so much. It is crazy to think that it took losing him for me to find my true self.

Tufts Supplements and Short Answers #1

Written by Anonymous Student

Verified Real Acceptance


Prompt

There is a Quaker saying: “Let your life speak.” Describe the environment in which you were raised – your family, home, neighborhood, or community – and how it influenced the person you are today. (250 words max)

I have always lived in the same neighborhood, in the same house, with the same bed but with an infinitely evolving atmosphere. My family started as my mom, my dad, my sister, and I. We did alright together--well, until my dad left for weeks at a time and eventually forever--but, let’s not get into that.

Soon, my mother started her 12-hour/day job so I began to see her less, but my grandmother and I decided to cook together, become coffee connoisseurs, and develop our relationship. My sister and I grew closer than ever, and her friends became my friends. I decided to manifest my ideal life, starting with my relationships and education. Soon, I found myself surrounded by beautiful people and with an indefinite fuel for knowledge. It seemed as though one person leaving made room for more to enter. I think that this could be the essence of life--negatives leads to positives which lead to more negatives until negatives and positives are no longer discernible and there are only events. Events, however, are still striking and meaningful, no matter their connotation.

Sure I have had some hard times, but, in reality, I have nothing to complain about. My life has been as tainted and beautiful as anyone else’s, full of average hardship and perpetual love. If nothing else, my experiences with my neighborhood, my grandmother, my education, and myself have taught me to squeeze the most out of every moment because memories last, but events always pass.

Prompt

Why Tufts? (100 words max)

What struck me most about Tufts was not only the warm, open, and energetic atmosphere, but also the students’ willingness to be walking contradictions. With the ExCollege ​encouraging interdisciplinary education through ​classes like ​EXP-0058-PS Health, Communication & Society, it is easy to be contradictory​ ​. During my visit, I met Biological Poets, Singing Physicists, and Mathematical Artists. I know that Tufts is right for me because it preaches everything I believe about synergistic learning. Being a contradiction my entire life--the scientific, mathematically inclined, yet literature obsessed barista--it was comforting to find a community of people identical to and completely different from me.

Tufts Supplements and Short Answers #2

Written by Anonymous Student

Verified Real Acceptance


Prompt

It's cool to be smart. Tell us about the subjects or ideas that excite your intellectual curiosity. (250 words max)

“Leland, you need a better hobby."

This is the universal reaction amongst my friends and family when I tell them one of my favorite pastimes: learning about presidential elections.

For me, elections are an exciting combination of many different subjects, which I take upon myself to untangle. There’s a heavily quantitative portion of elections, which involves calculating the paths each candidate can take to achieve 270 electoral votes. Speculating about how a candidate could’ve won is one of my favorite parts of politics. Take one of my favorite anecdotes: the state that lost Al Gore in the election of 2000 is his home state, Tennessee, not Florida. Gore could have won the election if he had put any amount of money into Tennessee, but he just assumed that he could carry the state since he was from there.

Social sciences also play an indispensable part in elections. For one, there are demographic trends - who's voting, and who are they voting for? How many votes do we need from Detroit for Hillary to carry Michigan? Finally, the most important part of elections to me are the issues that define and drive the election. Each year there are a varying set of divisive issues which each candidate must take a stance on in the hopes that their views will resonate with American citizens. These issues help people like me decide who to vote for, and although I've never voted in one, I love presidential elections.

Prompt

There is a Quaker saying: “Let your life speak.” Describe the environment in which you were raised – your family, home, neighborhood, or community – and how it influenced the person you are today. (250 words max)

My home is my shower. The shower is the only place where I am completely cut off from society, and I can just think. The shower is an attentive audience to my tone-deaf singing. The shower is there for me if I need to cry - my secrets are safe within its tiled walls. During the most turbulent days of my life, from the day my parents got divorced to the day I learned my neighbor had passed away, the shower was there for me. Throughout all the phases of my life, from moving to growing old, the shower will always be there to rain down comfort and insight. I used to run in and out of the shower as fast as I could, as being alone scared me, but now I embrace the isolation as some much-needed alone time. My house is clouded by tragic memories of my parents fighting, but the shower provides a sanctuary where I can escape. For me, the shower is a way to not only clear my mind, but to clear my soul. It is a reset button, a place where I can forget for a few minutes the stress that I have, and be transported to a world of peace.

Prompt

Which aspects of Tufts’ curriculum or undergraduate experience prompt your application? (100 words max)

Touring a college is not always enough to get a sense of what the college is like. But, I had the unique opportunity to meet with Professor Dennis Rasmussen and discuss Political Science at Tufts. He talked to me about the unique opportunities which Tufts students have, from the fantastic study abroad opportunities to a senior thesis which lets you dip your feet into research before moving onto higher education. The combination of Professor Rasmussen’s thoughtfulness and the school’s academic prowess proved to me that Tufts is the place to be.